Learning Center
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Frequently Asked Questions
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Why is it necessary for a tree company to have insurance?

By its very nature, tree work is dangerous and should only be done by a professional. Liability insurance is important because it protects you, the homeowner, and your property from potential risk and damage. Workman's compensation insurance protects tree care professionals while they are working on a job. When you are seeking to hire a tree company, be sure they carry both liability and workers compensation before any work is started. If you have any doubts, request certificates or call their insurance carrier for verification.

 

Do you work year round?

We do work year-round. We are prepared to move accumulated snow from work sites and deploy protective ground mats, if needed. We work in light rain and fog. However, driving rain or winds above 30 MPH will keep us inside.

 

How far will you travel?

Our service area encompasses Columbia County, and portions of Northern Dutchess, Eastern Greene and Southern Rensselaer Counties in Eastern New York State.

Caleb discussing pruning options in her maple during an arborist consultation.

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How do I make an appointment?

We offer online scheduling and our calendar is updated daily. You can call our office at 518-526-6675 to speak to Linda. You can also email us at newleaftreeservicesinc@gmail.com.

 

Do I need to be home for an estimate?

We understand that not everyone can meet during the time slots we have available. If you would like to forgo an in-person meeting, you can fill out our estimate form HERE. That way someone from our team can get all your information, stop by when we can, and send you a written proposal for requested and/or suggested tree work via email. If you make an appointment to meet with Caleb and realize you can’t make it we can still keep your appointment on our schedule, and we can call you when we arrive at your property to discuss a plan of action if necessary.

 

What are the next steps after meeting with Caleb?

We go back to our office to discuss notes and then write a full proposal with description(s) of how and why work will be completed and the cost, all of which is sent to you via email. You can then review, pick and choose work you want to accept, then accept and put down a 25% deposit all online. Then we add your work to our schedule.

 

What do you mean by reduction cut?

A reduction cut is a type of pruning cut that removes the larger of two or more branches or stems to a live lateral branch, typically at least one-third the diameter of the stem or branch being removed. Using this type of pruning will reduce the density of branches and foliage on the outer edges of the canopy, lessening the chance of branch failure.

 

Do I have to be home when the work is getting done?

Your time is valuable and we understand that your schedule may conflict. The client does not need to be present during the performance of the work. The crews are provided with a work order reflecting the services and job specifications contracted by the client along with a map of the property.

 

Can I keep the firewood from trees you cut down?

Yes. Logwood can be left in log lengths or cut to 16” rounds. We do not split the wood into firewood pieces.

 

Can I keep the wood chips?

Yes - and we encourage you to! Wood chips are very beneficial to be used in garden beds or mulch rings around trees. Other benefits of wood chips are weed control, moderating soil temperature, water retention, mulched paths, plant propagation growing and cultivating mushrooms, animal bedding, and soil health amendments.

How soon will my work be scheduled?

If your accepted job is an emergency, such as a fallen tree or tilting tree, we will do our best to address your needs as soon as possible. Otherwise, it varies depending on the season - people should inquire with the office to find out the current lead time for your work. 

 

What is the difference between stump grinding and stump removal?

Stump removal is the process of completely removing the entire stump from the ground, leaving a void behind, whereas stump grinding essentially “shaves down” the stump so that it is ground level. Stump Grinding is the more efficient of the two choices. We offer stump grinding as one of our services.

 

Can I preserve a tree without removing it?

This question depends on the type of damage your tree has sustained. It may be necessary to trim any natural or storm-related breakouts with proper pruning cuts to allow the tree to compartmentalize properly, which it can not do with splintery breakouts. Additionally, it is very important to do regular trimming and pruning to get rid of deadwood to mitigate the chances of limb failure.

Guarantee

We guarantee all work will be done in a professional and workmanlike manner to the specifications in the contract. Our work will meet or exceed standards set by the American National Institute (ANSI) and the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA).

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Glossary

COMMONLY USED ARBORIST TERMS AND DEFINITIONS

 

Branch: A shoot or stem arising from another branch or stem.
 

Branch bark ridge: The raised strip of bark on the top and side of a union where the branch and parent stem meet.
 

Branch collar: The area of swelling at the union between a parent stem and a smaller branch.
 

Codominant stem/codominant branch: Two or more stems or branches of similar diameter originating from the same union.
 

Interfering branches: Crossing, rubbing, or upright branches that have the potential to damage tree structure and/or health.
 

Lateral branch: A shoot or stem growing from a larger (parent) branch.
 

Parent stem/branch: A tree trunk, main stem, leader, or branch from which other smaller branches grow.
 

Crown: The part of a tree or shrub, measured from the lowest branch upward, including all the branches and foliage.
 

Decay: The degradation of woody tissue caused by microorganisms.
 

Directional pruning: Selective removal of branches to guide and/or discourage growth in a particular direction.
 

Flush cut: A pruning cut that removes the branch bark ridge and/or branch collar, damaging the trunk or parent branch.
 

Heading: Pruning cut that removes branch or stem between nodes (leaving a stub), to a bud, or to a live branch typically less than one-third the diameter of the branch or stem being removed.
 

Leader: A main trunk or stem that dominates all or a portion of the crown. Trees and shrubs may have one leader or several individual leaders.
 

Pruning: The selective removal of plant parts to achieve defined objectives.
 

Raising: Arboricultural term referring to pruning of branches to provide vertical clearance below the crown.
 

Reduction: Arboricultural term referring to decreasing branch length, or plant height and/or spread.
 

Reduction cut: A pruning cut that removes the larger of two or more branches or stems, or one or more codominant stem(s), to a live lateral branch. typically at least one-third the diameter of the stem or branch being removed.
 

Removal cut, branch: A pruning cut that removes the smaller of two branches at a union, or a parent stem, without cutting into the branch bark ridge or branch collar, or leaving a stub.
 

Shall: As used in this standard, denotes a mandatory requirement.
 

Shoot: New stem or branch growth.
 

Should: As used in this standard, denotes an advisory recommendation.
 

Sucker: Vigorous upright epicormic shoot that arises from latent buds below soil level or the graft union.
 

Thinning: An arboriculture term used to describe selective pruning to reduce density of branches and foliage.
 

Subordination: The removal of the end of a branch or stem to reduce leaf surface area, and to slow its growth relative to its parent, or to other branches or stems.

 
Helpful Links
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The International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) promotes the professional practice of arboriculture. ISA is focused on scientific advancement and the dissemination of empirical findings as a means of contributing to a world with healthier trees, sustainable communities, and a green economy.

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Invasive species are non-native species that can cause harm to the environment, the economy or human health. Invasives come from all around the world. As international trade increases, so does the rate of invasive species introductions.

Invasive species threaten nearly every aspect of our world and are one of the greatest threats to New York's biodiversity.

 

Invasive Animal Species:

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB)

Gypsy Moths (Lymantria dispar)

Hemlock Wooly Adelgid

Spotted Lanternfly

 

Diseases:

Oak Wilt

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TreesAreGood.org provides the public with educational information about the benefits of trees and how to properly care for trees in the urban environment. The site contains resources from the International Society of Arboriculture, and also provides a collection of reliable tree care information provided by other industry organizations.

Recommended Readings and Documentaries

NON-FICTION

FICTION

SEMI-FICTION

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New Leaf Tree Services receive my highest recommendation. Caleb and his crew were knowledgeable, professional, communicative and pleasant. They did a big job for us and worked hard every day. Our property looks so much better and they improved the look of several big old trees. We made a couple of changes to the job along the way and they were very flexible and took it in stride.

~ Sarah in Kinderhook, NY

All artwork created by Maude White. Original paper cuts of a native sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum).

trees-are-good-logo.png

TreesAreGood.org provides the public with educational information about the benefits of trees and how to properly care for trees in the urban environment. The site contains resources from the International Society of Arboriculture, and also provides a collection of reliable tree care information provided by other industry organizations.